202017Aug
How Do Your Bones Heal?

How Do Your Bones Heal?

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The human body has a remarkable ability to heal itself. When a bone breaks, referred to as a fracture, your body starts to make efforts to repair the damage and heal tissues immediately. How much assistance will be necessary to successfully complete this process will depend on the extent of the break, where it’s located, and whether or not surrounding muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves were also affected. Inflammation, Clotting, and Germ Killing The initial steps your body will take include triggering inflammation, which serves a protective purpose, and producing blood clots around the broken parts of the bone. Your immune system will dispatch special cells called phagocytes to kill…

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202017Jul
How to Avoid Sports-Related Injuries

How to Avoid Sports-Related Injuries

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Sprains (affecting ligaments) and strains (affecting muscles), stress fractures, and dislocations are among the most common sports-related injuries. Often affecting children and teens, sports-related injuries can sideline anyone who plays sports occasionally or on a regular basis. While not all injuries are avoidable, there are steps that can be taken to minimize the risk of sustaining a serious or distracting injury. Do a Proper Warm-Up Muscles need to be prepared for the stress that goes along with the repetitious motions associated with many sports-related activities. A warm-up can be as basic as 5-10 minutes of stretching that starts out slow and gradually increases pace. Warming up increases circulation to muscles…

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202017Jun
Orthopedics Throughout History

Orthopedics Throughout History

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Did you know that the principles of orthopedics were developed and used even during the ancient times? Ancient civilizations used these systems in describing the methods of recognizing and managing the most common orthopedic conditions. Additionally, the study of medicine in a systematic manner by Romans and Greeks significantly improved the understanding of surgical techniques and orthopedic anatomy, paving the way for orthopedic surgeons today. The modern word orthopedics was derived from the ancient word orthopedia. This was the title of a 1741 book published by Nicholas Andry, a professor at the University of Paris. The word orthopedia comprises two Greek words: orthos, which means “straight and deformity free” and…

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242017May
Eating for Your Musculoskeletal System

Eating for Your Musculoskeletal System

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Your musculoskeletal system is made up of all the bones and muscles in your body. It is easy to understand that keeping this system healthy is essential if you want to be active, flexible, and pain free. What isn’t so obvious is the way to achieve this healthy goal. You can influence your musculoskeletal system by controlling what you consume and how you move. We are concerned here primarily with what you eat. A healthy diet will pay dividends years down the road. Minerals Calcium and magnesium are the two most important minerals for your muscles and bones. You probably know that calcium gives your bones density and strength. It…

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182017Jan
Can I Prevent Osteoporosis?

Can I Prevent Osteoporosis?

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Osteoporosis is a chronic and progressive disorder that causes your bones to become increasingly brittle and weak. Your bones could be weakened so much by osteoporosis that coughing or a slip and fall in your home could cause a fracture. While some risk factors for osteoporosis cannot be controlled, such as your race and sex, there are important actions that you can take in order to prevent osteoporosis. Diet and Supplements An orthopedic doctor can help you to create a diet and exercise plan that offers some protection against osteoporosis. Although you reach your peak bone mass while you are in your 20s, it is not too late to make…

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212016Dec
Types of Broken Bones

Types of Broken Bones

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Breaks in bones, also called fractures, can occur anywhere within the body where there’s a bone or joint. Bones can break completely, become fractured in specific locations or patterns, or break into multiple pieces. Treatment for broken bones depends on where the break occurs, the severity of the break, and whether or not other tissues and joints were involved or affected. Types of Broken Bones Bones can break or fracture in many different ways. Breaks in bones can be in the form of a stable fracture, a clean break where the pieces of bones line up even though they are slightly out of place. A compound fracture is one where…

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212016Nov
3 Types of Dislocations

3 Types of Dislocations

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Occurring when a bone slips out of alignment or position, dislocations are often the result of a sudden impact, such as a hard fall or direct hit to the body. Pain from a dislocation is usually instantly recognizable due to the stress placed on supporting muscles, tendons, and ligaments—and sometimes on nearby nerves. Dislocations can affect any part of the body, but there are certain areas that tend to be more susceptible to this type of injury. Finger Dislocations Finger dislocations are usually caused by some type of motion or impact that extends a finger beyond where it normally stretches or bends. Middle joints of fingers are usually more susceptible…

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202016Oct
Diagnosis & Treatment of Sprains

Diagnosis & Treatment of Sprains

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Often affecting the lower back, neck, knees, wrists, and ankles, sprains can result from a sharp twist or turn, repetitive motions, or falling with little or no protection from the impact. Defined as a stretch or tear of a strong band of connective tissue called a ligament, a sprain is usually a temporary discomfort. Sometimes requiring medical attention, sprains can result in pain that ranges from intermittent and mild to sharp and severe. What Causes Sprains? As with other soft-tissue injuries, sprains can be either acute, develop over time from overuse, or occur when ligaments are already weakened or compromised from an underlying condition. Acute strains are the ones caused…

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152016Sep
Is Scoliosis Causing Your Back Pain?

Is Scoliosis Causing Your Back Pain?

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An abnormal curvature of the spine affecting about 3 percent of the population, scoliosis can be mild with little or no pain or severe enough to impact quality of life. Some forms of scoliosis advance during adolescence but not into adulthood. Surgery is rarely necessary unless the curvature is severe or causing debilitating pain. When Scoliosis Appears Children and teenagers are most-often affected by scoliosis, especially between the ages of 10 and 18, although it may be detected earlier if the curvature is clearly noticeable. If it develops later in life, it’s usually due to injury or age-related wear affecting spinal stability. Types of Scoliosis Scoliosis can be congenital, or…

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192016Aug
Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears

Treatment Options for Rotator Cuff Tears

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The rotator cuff is a part of the shoulder and includes several muscles and tendons that are attached to the shoulder joint. These muscles and ligaments are responsible for keeping the humorous bone within the socket of the shoulder. People who perform repeated overhead movements of their arms are at the highest risk of a rotator cuff tear. Playing baseball or tennis, painting walls and ceilings and installing overhead lights are some activities that could cause a tear in the rotator cuff. A person’s chances of getting a rotator cuff tear also increase with age. Symptoms of a Rotator Cuff Tear A person with a rotator cuff tear may have…

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202016Jul
Options for Herniated Discs

Options for Herniated Discs

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A common source of back and neck pain, herniated discs can result in little or no discomfort or extreme pain aggravated by movement, depending on how nearby nerves are affected. If your pain isn’t going away with conservative treatments or it’s becoming progressively worse, you may be directed to an orthopedic surgeon. What Causes a Herniated Disc? The 26 bones of your spine are cushioned by spongy discs to prevent excessive strain from your daily movements. A herniated disc results when the jelly-like substance inside of the disc is pushed through to the outside of the disc. This type of damage can be caused by: • Age-related wear, or degeneration…

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272016Jun
Five Common Types of Tendon Tears

Five Common Types of Tendon Tears

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There are several types of tendon tears that can lead to immobility or severe discomfort for a patient. One: An Achilles Tendon Rupture An Achilles tendon rupture happens frequently in a foot, especially during sports that include running or jumping. Older individuals are also more likely to incur this type of injury due to natural wear and tear to this tendon. Two: A Biceps Tendon Injury A bicep injury involves the arm because this tendon attaches the bicep muscle to the elbow and shoulder. When a tear occurs in this tendon, an individual will experience weakness in their arm from the shoulder to the hand. Three: A Rotator Cuff Tear…

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